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Good position for Guanyin altar at new home & dangers of constantly breathing joss fumes

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Dear Master
We'll be moving to a new flat soon, and would like to consult you on a good altar position for our Guanyin which we'll be moving over from current house. Pls see our unit layout as attached.
There are 3 potential positions we're looking at:
A: right next to main door, with adjacent DB (databox) which cannot be relocated. Width is only 48cm between main door and DB.
B: with bomb shelter as backing, outside kitchen.
C: immediate position adjacent to main door when it's fully opened
All positions do not get the sun.
Other questions:
1. Is it not advisable to have the shoe cabinet next or under the altar? Really tight on space to entertain this thought.
2. We also have a small (which we offer incense twice daily) that we currently place at our balcony, sheltered from rain. New unit's balcony will not be sheltered, so we thought of moving it to our service yard, which will have a window that protects it from natural elements. Is it advisable to place it at the service yard? There will be a washing machine opposite it, and clothes hanging to dry next to it, but not over it. Alternatively, can we do away with it totally?
Appreciate very much your kind advice on the above, thanks.

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These are some considerations:

In my opinion, it is considered inauspicious for an altar to face "inwards" into the home. For example, if one visits or pass by any of SGP's Minister's landed property home; the Gurkha Guard is always "facing" outwards but not into the home.

Thus, drawing a parallel; this is why marking "B" is a politically correct position. Just imagine; the "guards = god(s)" is not looking into the home i.e. the kitchen, the bedrooms - where some sort of business is done or "see into the toilet(s)".

Is like when one walks into the room; the guard(s) or god "stand at an attention and even "salute" with their rifle. Thus on paper marking D and X and Y are again "politically correct" locations also. And share the same significance as what was mentioned, above - similar to marking "B".

However, as you have pointed out; because of the afternoon sun; it is considered "disrespectful" for the god to be placed a locations "X" and "Y".

The last resort is locatio "L". Even if it seems to be facing into the house as in "C". But because it is at the balcony. here we should expect the "god" to know what to do. As one has given her; an alternative view. She can look to her "right" and this position is also considered as "sitting on mountain facing water (virtual water) air".

The best position WAS marking "A". But this is too tight for an altar be it the width and the depth. As often, you need also to pray with fruits etc.. And no way the God can be place here "comfortably". Else if the depth is to deep; as a traditional altar table depth is around 24". And the minimium is 16". I believe those "egged" shaped or oval shaped wall mounted "Guan Yin" altar may not have enough width clearance also.

Avoid placing shoes or shoe cabinet in the lower cabinet of the altar.

Another last resort is placing the altar at "E" within a partition facing the main door. But, there are several criticisms for this:

1. If main door directly faces neighbour's door; some Chinese neighbour may suddenly place a convex ba gua mirror above their door; as to some; this is considered a "threat" to their home. Thus some may take such "counter-measures".

2. Some may consider that this is disrespectful to the god as one is "deploying" the god as a "door keeper" e.g. a guard much like a condo guard; "taking down" one's particulars before the guest enters into the home.

3. In addition, this unit is too small and the partition can be like knife slicing towards the dining table or dining chair. And this partition should not "slice" towards any of the foyer hall into the bedroom.

4. Position "B" seems no choice. As if one do a search in the internet for "lung cancer + lighting up joss sticks" can find an article of a study done in Singapore when it was found that there was some correlation to lung cancer and "frequent lighting up of joss sticks".

If intends to light up (alot) at "B"; and if there are elderly family or (even young) staying in the house most of the time; then this is a concern as some of the smoke from the joss sticks wil certainly flow into the bedroom(s). Some say they use electronic joss sticks? To some may not be acceptable.

If one hangs or intends to hang cloths to dry in the yard; then looks like there is limited area to place an urn etc... But, if one uses say a washing machine dryer and hang clothes to dry only at the balcony and there is no altar at A or Y; then could be considered. In the past, there is space above the fridge; leave some gap; then an "altar" can be placed there except for things like Guan Yin or Guan Kong etc...

Please see attachment


Quote
On 3/8/2015 7:20:57 PM, Anonymous wrote:
Dear Master
We'll be moving to a new flat
soon, and would like to
consult you on a good altar
position for our Guanyin which
we'll be moving over from
current house. Pls see our
unit layout as attached.
There are 3 potential
positions we're looking at:
A: right next to main door,
with adjacent DB (databox)
which cannot be relocated.
Width is only 48cm between
main door and DB.
B: with bomb shelter as
backing, outside kitchen.
C: immediate position adjacent
to main door when it's fully
opened
All positions do not get the
sun.
Other questions:
1. Is it not advisable to have
the shoe cabinet next or under
the altar? Really tight on
space to entertain this
thought.
2. We also have a small
?V????
(which we offer incense twice
daily) that we currently place
at our balcony, sheltered from
rain. New unit's balcony will
not be sheltered, so we
thought of moving it to our
service yard, which will have
a window that protects it from
natural elements. Is it
advisable to place it at the
service yard? There will be a
washing machine opposite it,
and clothes hanging to dry
next to it, but not over it.
Alternatively, can we do away
with it totally?
Appreciate very much your kind
advice on the above, thanks.


Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

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Share on other sites

These are some considerations:

In my opinion, it is considered inauspicious for an altar to face "inwards" into the home. For example, if one visits or pass by any of SGP's Minister's landed property home; the Gurkha Guard is always "facing" outwards but not into the home.

Thus, drawing a parallel; this is why marking "B" is a politically correct position. Just imagine; the "guards = god(s)" is not looking into the home i.e. the kitchen, the bedrooms - where some sort of business is done or "see into the toilet(s)".

Is like when one walks into the room; the guard(s) or god "stand at an attention and even "salute" with their rifle. Thus on paper marking D and X and Y are again "politically correct" locations also. And share the same significance as what was mentioned, above - similar to marking "B".

However, as you have pointed out; because of the afternoon sun; it is considered "disrespectful" for the god to be placed a locations "X" and "Y".

The last resort is locatio "L". Even if it seems to be facing into the house as in "C". But because it is at the balcony. here we should expect the "god" to know what to do. As one has given her; an alternative view. She can look to her "right" and this position is also considered as "sitting on mountain facing water (virtual water) air".

The best position WAS marking "A". But this is too tight for an altar be it the width and the depth. As often, you need also to pray with fruits etc.. And no way the God can be place here "comfortably". Else if the depth is to deep; as a traditional altar table depth is around 24". And the minimium is 16". I believe those "egged" shaped or oval shaped wall mounted "Guan Yin" altar may not have enough width clearance also.

Avoid placing shoes or shoe cabinet in the lower cabinet of the altar.

Another last resort is placing the altar at "E" within a partition facing the main door. But, there are several criticisms for this:

1. If main door directly faces neighbour's door; some Chinese neighbour may suddenly place a convex ba gua mirror above their door; as to some; this is considered a "threat" to their home. Thus some may take such "counter-measures".

2. Some may consider that this is disrespectful to the god as one is "deploying" the god as a "door keeper" e.g. a guard much like a condo guard; "taking down" one's particulars before the guest enters into the home.

3. In addition, this unit is too small and the partition can be like knife slicing towards the dining table or dining chair. And this partition should not "slice" towards any of the foyer hall into the bedroom.

4. Position "B" seems no choice. As if one do a search in the internet for "lung cancer + lighting up joss sticks" can find an article of a study done in Singapore when it was found that there was some correlation to lung cancer and "frequent lighting up of joss sticks".

If intends to light up (alot) at "B"; and if there are elderly family or (even young) staying in the house most of the time; then this is a concern as some of the smoke from the joss sticks wil certainly flow into the bedroom(s). Some say they use electronic joss sticks? To some may not be acceptable.

If one hangs or intends to hang cloths to dry in the yard; then looks like there is limited area to place an urn etc... But, if one uses say a washing machine dryer and hang clothes to dry only at the balcony and there is no altar at A or Y; then could be considered. In the past, there is space above the fridge; leave some gap; then an "altar" can be placed there except for things like Guan Yin or Guan Kong etc...

Please see attachment


Quote
On 3/8/2015 7:20:57 PM, Anonymous wrote:
Dear Master
We'll be moving to a new flat
soon, and would like to
consult you on a good altar
position for our Guanyin which
we'll be moving over from
current house. Pls see our
unit layout as attached.
There are 3 potential
positions we're looking at:
A: right next to main door,
with adjacent DB (databox)
which cannot be relocated.
Width is only 48cm between
main door and DB.
B: with bomb shelter as
backing, outside kitchen.
C: immediate position adjacent
to main door when it's fully
opened
All positions do not get the
sun.
Other questions:
1. Is it not advisable to have
the shoe cabinet next or under
the altar? Really tight on
space to entertain this
thought.
2. We also have a small
?V????
(which we offer incense twice
daily) that we currently place
at our balcony, sheltered from
rain. New unit's balcony will
not be sheltered, so we
thought of moving it to our
service yard, which will have
a window that protects it from
natural elements. Is it
advisable to place it at the
service yard? There will be a
washing machine opposite it,
and clothes hanging to dry
next to it, but not over it.
Alternatively, can we do away
with it totally?
Appreciate very much your kind
advice on the above, thanks.


Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote
On 3/8/2015 7:51:40 PM, Anonymous wrote:
These are some considerations:
In my opinion, it is

Attached, please find an illustration showing that if one were to light up joss sticks especially 24 hours a day then, the fume trails may end up entering the bedrooms.


This is particularly so; if the altar is at marking "B" and/or "D".

Altar at "D" is not practical as this is the valuable real estate space for the TV or sofa or vice-versa.

I did a simple search and these are some of the recent comments on joss sticks and cancer. In the past, I managed to link to the Singapore I believe an NUS study of elders with altars and correlation with lung cancer.


Burning joss sticks 'as deadly as traffic fumes or ...
www.theguardian.com/world/2008/jul/30/health

Thai doctor warns worshippers that joss stick smoke fills temples with cancer-causing toxins
.

Joss sticks 'as damaging to health as passive smoking ...
www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1019115/Joss-sticks-damaging...

Joss sticks 'as damaging to health as passive smoking' ... Joss stick smoke contains harmful ... The research likens breathing in the fumes to inhaling second hand ...
.

All About Cancer - Hong Kong Cancer Fund
www.cancer-fund.org/en/cancer_news_186.html

Incense fumes could do more harm to your health than tobacco smoke . ... a spokesman for the Cheng Kung group, likens incense and joss-stick fumes to second-hand smoke.
.

Joss Sticks 'Like Cigarette Fumes' - Tobacco.org : Welcome
archive.tobacco.org/news/265190.html

Joss sticks contain carbon monoxide and other toxic fumes. The research suggests that breathing in the toxic fumes is as bad for the health as inhaling tobacco smoke
.

Burning joss sticks 'as deadly as traffic fumes or ...
www.buddhistchannel.tv/index.php?id=7,6913,0,0,1,0

Burning joss sticks 'as deadly as traffic fumes or cigarette smoke' by Ian MacKinnon, The Guardian, July 30 2008. Bangkok, Thailand-- Worship is generally not a life ...
.

Joss sticks 'like cigarette fumes' | Metro News
metro.co.uk/2008/05/11/joss-sticks-like-cigarette-fumes-138754

Burning incense may be good for spiritual well-being but it could also be bad for your health. The fragrant smoke, used in religious ceremonies and to scent rooms ...
.

Do joss/incense sticks produce something similar to ...
www.heenamodi.com/2008/05/20/do-jossincense-sticks-produce...

My friend was telling me that he heard a news report about joss/incense sticks ... produce something similar to ?cigarette ... the toxic fumes is as bad for ...


Quote
considered inauspicious for an
altar to face "inwards" into
the home. For example, if one
visits or pass by any of SGP's
Minister's landed property
home; the Gurkha Guard is
always "facing" outwards but
not into the home.
Thus, drawing a parallel; this
is why marking "B" is a
politically correct position.
Just imagine; the "guards =
god(s)" is not looking into
the home i.e. the kitchen, the
bedrooms - where some sort of
business is done or "see into
the toilet(s)".
Is like when one walks into
the room; the guard(s) or god
"stand at an attention and
even "salute" with their
rifle. Thus on paper marking D
and X and Y are again
"politically correct"
locations also. And share the
same significance as what was
mentioned, above - similar to
marking "B".
However, as you have pointed
out; because of the afternoon
sun; it is considered
"disrespectful" for the god to
be placed a locations "X" and
"Y".
The last resort is locatio
"L". Even if it seems to be
facing into the house as in
"C". But because it is at the
balcony. here we should expect
the "god" to know what to do.
As one has given her; an
alternative view. She can look
to her "right" and this
position is also considered as
"sitting on mountain facing
water (virtual water) air".
The best position WAS marking
"A". But this is too tight for
an altar be it the width and
the depth. As often, you need
also to pray with fruits etc..
And no way the God can be
place here "comfortably". Else
if the depth is to deep; as a
traditional altar table depth
is around 24". And the
minimium is 16". I believe
those "egged" shaped or oval
shaped wall mounted "Guan Yin"
altar may not have enough
width clearance also.
Avoid placing shoes or shoe
cabinet in the lower cabinet
of the altar.
Another last resort is placing
the altar at "E" within a
partition facing the main
door. But, there are several
criticisms for this:
1. If main door directly faces
neighbour's door; some Chinese
neighbour may suddenly place a
convex ba gua mirror above
their door; as to some; this
is considered a "threat" to
their home. Thus some may take
such "counter-measures".
2. Some may consider that this
is disrespectful to the god as
one is "deploying" the god as
a "door keeper" e.g. a guard
much like a condo guard;
"taking down" one's
particulars before the guest
enters into the home.
3. In addition, this unit is
too small and the partition
can be like knife slicing
towards the dining table or
dining chair. And this
partition should not "slice"
towards any of the foyer hall
into the bedroom.
4. Position "B" seems no
choice. As if one do a search
in the internet for "lung
cancer + lighting up joss
sticks" can find an article of
a study done in Singapore when
it was found that there was
some correlation to lung
cancer and "frequent lighting
up of joss sticks".
If intends to light up (alot)
at "B"; and if there are
elderly family or (even young)
staying in the house most of
the time; then this is a
concern as some of the smoke
from the joss sticks wil
certainly flow into the
bedroom(s). Some say they use
electronic joss sticks? To
some may not be acceptable.
If one hangs or intends to
hang cloths to dry in the
yard; then looks like there is
limited area to place an urn
etc... But, if one uses say a
washing machine dryer and hang
clothes to dry only at the
balcony and there is no altar
at A or Y; then could be
considered. In the past, there
is space above the fridge;
leave some gap; then an
"altar" can be placed there
except for things like Guan
Yin or Guan Kong etc...
Please see attachment

Quote
On 3/8/2015 7:20:57 PM, Anonymous wrote:
Dear Master
We'll be moving to a new flat
soon, and would like to
consult you on a good altar
position for our Guanyin which
we'll be moving over from
current house. Pls see our
unit layout as attached.
There are 3 potential
positions we're looking at:
A: right next to main door,
with adjacent DB (databox)
which cannot be relocated.
Width is only 48cm between
main door and DB.
B: with bomb shelter as
backing, outside kitchen.
C: immediate position adjacent
to main door when it's fully
opened
All positions do not get the
sun.
Other questions:
1. Is it not advisable to have
the shoe cabinet next or under
the altar? Really tight on
space to entertain this
thought.
2. We also have a small
?V????
(which we offer incense twice
daily) that we currently place
at our balcony, sheltered from
rain. New unit's balcony will
not be sheltered, so we
thought of moving it to our
service yard, which will have
a window that protects it from
natural elements. Is it
advisable to place it at the
service yard? There will be a
washing machine opposite it,
and clothes hanging to dry
next to it, but not over it.
Alternatively, can we do away
with it totally?
Appreciate very much your kind
advice on the above, thanks.


Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Master, thank you for your kind advice, let me summarize as follows to make sure I'm getting it right:

1. position A is most ideal (as it looks out into the balcony?), but because of the limited space - 43cm wide by 24/43cm deep, it may not be a comfortably large enough space for Guanyin.

2. Position B is second best, only cons is the incense fumes going into the rooms. I'll like to assure that we offer incense twice a day - most people will be out in the morning, and not back yet in the evening when this happens. We would also make sure all windows are opened for better air circulation when there are people in the house.

3. Position L can also be considered although it's in the balcony (it'll be against a concrete wall, no balcony windows on the right, perhaps only outdoor blinds) and we may dry clothes at the balcony, say position Y?

4. Position C is not preferred at all.


Considering the above, we may go for position B.
Appreciate your kind advice, thanks.

Quote
On 3/8/2015 7:51:40 PM, Anonymous wrote:
These are some considerations:
In my opinion, it is
considered inauspicious for an
altar to face "inwards" into
the home. For example, if one
visits or pass by any of SGP's
Minister's landed property
home; the Gurkha Guard is
always "facing" outwards but
not into the home.
Thus, drawing a parallel; this
is why marking "B" is a
politically correct position.
Just imagine; the "guards =
god(s)" is not looking into
the home i.e. the kitchen, the
bedrooms - where some sort of
business is done or "see into
the toilet(s)".
Is like when one walks into
the room; the guard(s) or god
"stand at an attention and
even "salute" with their
rifle. Thus on paper marking D
and X and Y are again
"politically correct"
locations also. And share the
same significance as what was
mentioned, above - similar to
marking "B".
However, as you have pointed
out; because of the afternoon
sun; it is considered
"disrespectful" for the god to
be placed a locations "X" and
"Y".
The last resort is locatio
"L". Even if it seems to be
facing into the house as in
"C". But because it is at the
balcony. here we should expect
the "god" to know what to do.
As one has given her; an
alternative view. She can look
to her "right" and this
position is also considered as
"sitting on mountain facing
water (virtual water) air".
The best position WAS marking
"A". But this is too tight for
an altar be it the width and
the depth. As often, you need
also to pray with fruits etc..
And no way the God can be
place here "comfortably". Else
if the depth is to deep; as a
traditional altar table depth
is around 24". And the
minimium is 16". I believe
those "egged" shaped or oval
shaped wall mounted "Guan Yin"
altar may not have enough
width clearance also.
Avoid placing shoes or shoe
cabinet in the lower cabinet
of the altar.
Another last resort is placing
the altar at "E" within a
partition facing the main
door. But, there are several
criticisms for this:
1. If main door directly faces
neighbour's door; some Chinese
neighbour may suddenly place a
convex ba gua mirror above
their door; as to some; this
is considered a "threat" to
their home. Thus some may take
such "counter-measures".
2. Some may consider that this
is disrespectful to the god as
one is "deploying" the god as
a "door keeper" e.g. a guard
much like a condo guard;
"taking down" one's
particulars before the guest
enters into the home.
3. In addition, this unit is
too small and the partition
can be like knife slicing
towards the dining table or
dining chair. And this
partition should not "slice"
towards any of the foyer hall
into the bedroom.
4. Position "B" seems no
choice. As if one do a search
in the internet for "lung
cancer + lighting up joss
sticks" can find an article of
a study done in Singapore when
it was found that there was
some correlation to lung
cancer and "frequent lighting
up of joss sticks".
If intends to light up (alot)
at "B"; and if there are
elderly family or (even young)
staying in the house most of
the time; then this is a
concern as some of the smoke
from the joss sticks wil
certainly flow into the
bedroom(s). Some say they use
electronic joss sticks? To
some may not be acceptable.
If one hangs or intends to
hang cloths to dry in the
yard; then looks like there is
limited area to place an urn
etc... But, if one uses say a
washing machine dryer and hang
clothes to dry only at the
balcony and there is no altar
at A or Y; then could be
considered. In the past, there
is space above the fridge;
leave some gap; then an
"altar" can be placed there
except for things like Guan
Yin or Guan Kong etc...
Please see attachment

Quote
On 3/8/2015 7:20:57 PM, Anonymous wrote:
Dear Master
We'll be moving to a new flat
soon, and would like to
consult you on a good altar
position for our Guanyin which
we'll be moving over from
current house. Pls see our
unit layout as attached.
There are 3 potential
positions we're looking at:
A: right next to main door,
with adjacent DB (databox)
which cannot be relocated.
Width is only 48cm between
main door and DB.
B: with bomb shelter as
backing, outside kitchen.
C: immediate position adjacent
to main door when it's fully
opened
All positions do not get the
sun.
Other questions:
1. Is it not advisable to have
the shoe cabinet next or under
the altar? Really tight on
space to entertain this
thought.
2. We also have a small
?V????
(which we offer incense twice
daily) that we currently place
at our balcony, sheltered from
rain. New unit's balcony will
not be sheltered, so we
thought of moving it to our
service yard, which will have
a window that protects it from
natural elements. Is it
advisable to place it at the
service yard? There will be a
washing machine opposite it,
and clothes hanging to dry
next to it, but not over it.
Alternatively, can we do away
with it totally?
Appreciate very much your kind
advice on the above, thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These are some considerations:-

1. Yes, unfortunately position A is TRULY too close to the main door. But there are some who buy a wall mounted "oval" shaped Guan Yin niche. But this means that it has to be hung very high. And even if it is hung very high; if fruits are offered; then the "pull out drawer" may hinder movement or if one is tall; could knock into. it.

Worse still, if one accidentally bring in items home and knock parts of the wall mounted altar or even if it is a full table top altar; often, the sides may get "nicked".

Yes; considering all the various alternatives; position B is one of the more popular position for this "kind" of layout. As position D is a premium "real estate" location where you most likely have the TV set placed there; and/or vice versa (between the sofa and the TV area).

The very last resort could be position L. But it may have to be closer to the sliding door; in case of strong winds and rain that may dampen the altar table. For example; if directly in-front of your stack/unit is an exposed area; and if strong winds and rain "comes in" then this ain't too good. If this only happens like once in "50 years" may still be Okay.

Out of respect for say Guan Yin or other gods; it is "nice-to" not hang clothes at location Y.

But, the good news is that if one purchase an off the shelf altar; it is often at the height of 49 3/4 inches which is roughly 127 cm. At this height; and if the clothes are hung lower should not be a major problem. For heaven's sake; if one's god is Goddess of Mercy; she should be more accommodating and/or more forgiving.

For example, drawing a parallel; in many landed properties; and if the owner prays to a god/altar; just imagine walking into such a home. You will first see the living room. And most likely walk one or two steps and see the dining table. And often the wall facing the dining table is the altar.

And even if one were to eat at the dining table; often the dining table is approximately around 33, 34 or 35 inches plus minus; no issue with the god facing this dining table. Especially since the altar table top height is at 49 3/4 inches. Unless the altar is lower at e.g. 34 etc.. then when we eat "hor fun"; the god would be salivating...

It is good to know that no one is at home when the "fumes" from the joss sticks are burning.

If one is still young and would not likely be a retiree; and if one's children (if any) is not spending half a day or more at home; then what you mentioned sounds fine.

What I mentioned was the previous study of elders and if I am not mistaken; theirs could be those 3 room or 1 room HDB flat. Looking at your layout; this unit; and how wind flow (on occasions) it may flow into the room - that's all. Thus for now; no elderly parents staying in this house is fine or okay.


Quote
On 3/8/2015 10:26:43 PM, Anonymous wrote:
Dear Master, thank you for
your kind advice, let me
summarize as follows to make
sure I'm getting it right:
1. position A is most ideal
(as it looks out into the
balcony?), but because of the
limited space - 43cm wide by
24/43cm deep, it may not be a
comfortably large enough space
for Guanyin.
2. Position B is second best,
only cons is the incense fumes
going into the rooms. I'll
like to assure that we offer
incense twice a day - most
people will be out in the
morning, and not back yet in
the evening when this happens.
We would also make sure all
windows are opened for better
air circulation when there are
people in the house.
3. Position L can also be
considered although it's in
the balcony (it'll be against
a concrete wall, no balcony
windows on the right, perhaps
only outdoor blinds) and we
may dry clothes at the
balcony, say position Y?
4. Position C is not preferred
at all.
Considering the above, we may
go for position B.
Appreciate your kind advice,
thanks.

Quote
On 3/8/2015 7:51:40 PM, Anonymous wrote:
These are some considerations:
In my opinion, it is
considered inauspicious for an
altar to face "inwards" into
the home. For example, if one
visits or pass by any of SGP's
Minister's landed property
home; the Gurkha Guard is
always "facing" outwards but
not into the home.
Thus, drawing a parallel; this
is why marking "B" is a
politically correct position.
Just imagine; the "guards =
god(s)" is not looking into
the home i.e. the kitchen, the
bedrooms - where some sort of
business is done or "see into
the toilet(s)".
Is like when one walks into
the room; the guard(s) or god
"stand at an attention and
even "salute" with their
rifle. Thus on paper marking D
and X and Y are again
"politically correct"
locations also. And share the
same significance as what was
mentioned, above - similar to
marking "B".
However, as you have pointed
out; because of the afternoon
sun; it is considered
"disrespectful" for the god to
be placed a locations "X" and
"Y".
The last resort is locatio
"L". Even if it seems to be
facing into the house as in
"C". But because it is at the
balcony. here we should expect
the "god" to know what to do.
As one has given her; an
alternative view. She can look
to her "right" and this
position is also considered as
"sitting on mountain facing
water (virtual water) air".
The best position WAS marking
"A". But this is too tight for
an altar be it the width and
the depth. As often, you need
also to pray with fruits etc..
And no way the God can be
place here "comfortably". Else
if the depth is to deep; as a
traditional altar table depth
is around 24". And the
minimium is 16". I believe
those "egged" shaped or oval
shaped wall mounted "Guan Yin"
altar may not have enough
width clearance also.
Avoid placing shoes or shoe
cabinet in the lower cabinet
of the altar.
Another last resort is placing
the altar at "E" within a
partition facing the main
door. But, there are several
criticisms for this:
1. If main door directly faces
neighbour's door; some Chinese
neighbour may suddenly place a
convex ba gua mirror above
their door; as to some; this
is considered a "threat" to
their home. Thus some may take
such "counter-measures".
2. Some may consider that this
is disrespectful to the god as
one is "deploying" the god as
a "door keeper" e.g. a guard
much like a condo guard;
"taking down" one's
particulars before the guest
enters into the home.
3. In addition, this unit is
too small and the partition
can be like knife slicing
towards the dining table or
dining chair. And this
partition should not "slice"
towards any of the foyer hall
into the bedroom.
4. Position "B" seems no
choice. As if one do a search
in the internet for "lung
cancer + lighting up joss
sticks" can find an article of
a study done in Singapore when
it was found that there was
some correlation to lung
cancer and "frequent lighting
up of joss sticks".
If intends to light up (alot)
at "B"; and if there are
elderly family or (even young)
staying in the house most of
the time; then this is a
concern as some of the smoke
from the joss sticks wil
certainly flow into the
bedroom(s). Some say they use
electronic joss sticks? To
some may not be acceptable.
If one hangs or intends to
hang cloths to dry in the
yard; then looks like there is
limited area to place an urn
etc... But, if one uses say a
washing machine dryer and hang
clothes to dry only at the
balcony and there is no altar
at A or Y; then could be
considered. In the past, there
is space above the fridge;
leave some gap; then an
"altar" can be placed there
except for things like Guan
Yin or Guan Kong etc...
Please see attachment

>

Quote
On 3/8/2015 7:20:57 PM, Anonymous wrote:
Dear Master
We'll be moving to a new flat
soon, and would like to
consult you on a good altar
position for our Guanyin which
we'll be moving over from
current house. Pls see our
unit layout as attached.
There are 3 potential
positions we're looking at:
A: right next to main door,
with adjacent DB (databox)
which cannot be relocated.
Width is only 48cm between
main door and DB.
B: with bomb shelter as
backing, outside kitchen.
C: immediate position adjacent
to main door when it's fully
opened
All positions do not get the
sun.
Other questions:
1. Is it not advisable to have
the shoe cabinet next or under
the altar? Really tight on
space to entertain this
thought.
2. We also have a small
?V????
(which we offer incense twice
daily) that we currently place
at our balcony, sheltered from
rain. New unit's balcony will
not be sheltered, so we
thought of moving it to our
service yard, which will have
a window that protects it from
natural elements. Is it
advisable to place it at the
service yard? There will be a
washing machine opposite it,
and clothes hanging to dry
next to it, but not over it.
Alternatively, can we do away
with it totally?
Appreciate very much your kind
advice on the above, thanks.


Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

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If one has the time, can also search for past articles in this forum.

One of the interesting link is:-
http://forum.geomancy.net/phpforum/article.php?bid=2&fid=6&mid=32488&new=

The article also shows the study carried out in Singapore. See below: perhaps some views are not 100 percent concrete but the saying goes: "better safe then sorry, later.. no cure..." :-


Source: www.scmp.com

Incense fumes could do more harm to your health than tobacco smoke

It's one of the familiar smells of Asia, from the temple to the family altar, but the next time you are surrounded by a cloud of incense smoke you may want to hold your nose.

Research in Taiwan has lent credence to suspicions that the joss sticks and incense that are burned as offerings to the gods may get you to heaven far quicker than you'd like.

Medical professionals have long suspected that joss sticks and incense - usually containing a blend of plant extracts and oils - emit harmful fumes when burned. Now, researchers from Taiwan's National Cheng Kung University in Tainan say joss fumes contain particulate matter, gases and organic compounds that could be more harmful than tobacco smoke.

"On average, incense burning produces particulates greater than 45 milligrams per gram burned, as compared to 10mg/g for cigarettes," says a report by Cheng Kung University's department of engineering.

Researchers studied the make-up and fumes from incense, joss sticks, cones and coils, and analysed smoke from a Taipei temple, which was found to contain high levels of compounds blamed for causing lung cancer.

Emissions levels were higher than at a city road junction. The toxins found are harmful to the lungs and can cause allergic reaction to the skin and eyes.

Lin Ta-chang, a spokesman for the Cheng Kung group, likens incense and joss-stick fumes to second-hand smoke.

"Pollutants emitted from incense burning in an enclosed environment are harmful to human health," he says.

"While it is relatively difficult to directly study the effect of incense smoke pollutants on health, several epidemiological studies have suggested that they do cause health problems."

Incense burning produces volatile organic compounds such as benzene, toluene and xylenes, as well as aldehydes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the study found.

The scientists, who conducted their study research in 2008, noted that during some major ceremonies, hundreds or even more than 1,000 joss sticks are burned at the same time.

Britain's National Health Service, which reviewed the Taiwanese study, said: "Smoke is smoke, and cigarette smoke is not the only type of smoke that is harmful."



A multinational study in 2008 also found that exposure to incense fumes posed significant public health implications. Jeppe Friborg, of the States Serum Institute in Copenhagen, and colleagues in Singapore and the US studied associations between exposure to incense and a spectrum of respiratory tract cancers.

They sampled 61,320 Singaporean Chinese who were free of cancer and aged between 45 and 74 from 1993 to 1998, studying respondents' living conditions and dietary and lifestyle factors until 2005.

They found 325 upper-respiratory tract cancers - including nasal/sinus, tongue, mouth, laryngeal and others - and 821 lung cancers during the follow-up period.



The American Cancer Society said at the time that "incense use is associated with a significantly increased risk of upper-respiratory tract cancer" although there was no overall effect on lung cancer.

"It also considerably increased the risk in `never' smokers, which points to an independent effect of incense smoke."

The Taiwanese researchers also cited a 1996 report in the journal Cancer that showed a high incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in male Hong Kong patients who burn incense, compared with other malignant cases.

They found that 74.5 per cent of the nasopharyngeal cancer cases studied and 52 per cent of all other malignant cases were exposed to incense smoke, and concluded that incense smoke could be a factor.

Ko King-tim, an engineering professor at City University now in remission from the cancer, says the public must be aware of such risks although he doesn't link his disease with incense-burning.

"Most people are not aware of the causes of various cancers. Some are genetic, some are [linked to] substances or stress-induced," says Ko, who created a website for people with nasopharyngeal cancer.

"Most people in Hong Kong are unaware of the early symptoms of different cancers. Awareness of these early symptoms could save a lot of lives," he says.

"Air pollutants such as incense smoke or car exhaust fumes are hazardous to health, whether [they cause] cancers or other illnesses."

Although various "herbal" and "natural" incense options are also sold on the internet, the Taiwanese researchers stopped short of calling for an end to the deeply rooted tradition of burning incense, with Lin recommending devotees "keep the room well-ventilated" while they burn it.

"It will effectively dilute indoor air pollutants and hence reduce the risk of exposure."

Incense sticks have a slender bamboo stick onto which the mixture of ingredients is attached, while joss sticks come without the stick. Stick incense is the most popular in temples in Asia.

While the exact content of incense sticks is a commercial secret, most are made from a combination of fragrant gums, resins, wood powders, herbs and spices, the report says.

A typical stick of incense comprises, by weight, 21 per cent herb and wood powder, 35 per cent fragrance material, 11 per cent adhesive powder and 33 per cent bamboo stick.

Source: www.scmp.com



Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

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Further to what I had mentioned; earlier:-

 

It is very common to see such a layout at the ground floor level of a landed property. See attachment.

Here, one can see in this illustration that the altar is often placed over-looking the dining table. If one had purchased an altar table; it would often be at approximately 49 3/4 inches height.

And in this illustration; as the dining table is often around 33" height ; there is no issue with eating at the table and say the Guan Yin figurine facing the dining table.

Thus under marking "L" even if the altar is placed at this location may not be an issue especially if clothes are hung lower and/or facing the altar.

The fact that Guan Yin is at location "L"; can't she be considerate (enough!) and just tilt her head slightly to the right to have a view out of the balcony. Hey! But if G.Y. is not going to be so accommodating; then might be better off... not.... (censored, censored... da da da )

 

 

Quote

On 3/8/2015 11:07:39 PM, Anonymous wrote:
If one has the time, can also
search for past articles in
this forum.
One of the interesting link
is:-
http://forum.geomancy.net/phpf
orum/article.php?bid=2&fid=6&m
id=32488&new=
The article also shows the
study carried out in
Singapore. See below: perhaps
some views are not 100 percent
concrete but the saying goes:
"better safe then sorry,
later.. no cure..." :-
Source: www.scmp.com
Incense fumes could do more
harm to your health than
tobacco smoke
It's one of the familiar
smells of Asia, from the
temple to the family altar,
but the next time you are
surrounded by a cloud of
incense smoke you may want to
hold your nose.
Research in Taiwan has lent
credence to suspicions that
the joss sticks and incense
that are burned as offerings
to the gods may get you to
heaven far quicker than you'd
like.
Medical professionals have
long suspected that joss
sticks and incense - usually
containing a blend of plant
extracts and oils - emit
harmful fumes when burned.
Now, researchers from Taiwan's
National Cheng Kung University
in Tainan say joss fumes
contain particulate matter,
gases and organic compounds
that could be more harmful
than tobacco smoke.
"On average, incense burning
produces particulates greater
than 45 milligrams per gram
burned, as compared to 10mg/g
for cigarettes," says a report
by Cheng Kung University's
department of engineering.
Researchers studied the
make-up and fumes from
incense, joss sticks, cones
and coils, and analysed smoke
from a Taipei temple, which
was found to contain high
levels of compounds blamed for
causing lung cancer.
Emissions levels were higher
than at a city road junction.
The toxins found are harmful
to the lungs and can cause
allergic reaction to the skin
and eyes.
Lin Ta-chang, a spokesman for
the Cheng Kung group, likens
incense and joss-stick fumes
to second-hand smoke.
"Pollutants emitted from
incense burning in an enclosed
environment are harmful to
human health," he says.
"While it is relatively
difficult to directly study
the effect of incense smoke
pollutants on health, several
epidemiological studies have
suggested that they do cause
health problems."
Incense burning produces
volatile organic compounds
such as benzene, toluene and
xylenes, as well as aldehydes
and polycyclic aromatic
hydrocarbons, the study found.
The scientists, who conducted
their study research in 2008,
noted that during some major
ceremonies, hundreds or even
more than 1,000 joss sticks
are burned at the same time.
Britain's National Health
Service, which reviewed the
Taiwanese study, said: "Smoke
is smoke, and cigarette smoke
is not the only type of smoke
that is harmful."
A multinational study in 2008
also found that exposure to
incense fumes posed
significant public health
implications. Jeppe Friborg,
of the States Serum Institute
in Copenhagen, and colleagues
in Singapore and the US
studied associations between
exposure to incense and a
spectrum of respiratory tract
cancers.
They sampled 61,320
Singaporean Chinese who were
free of cancer and aged
between 45 and 74 from 1993 to
1998, studying respondents'
living conditions and dietary
and lifestyle factors until
2005.
They found 325
upper-respiratory tract
cancers - including
nasal/sinus, tongue, mouth,
laryngeal and others - and 821
lung cancers during the
follow-up period.
The American Cancer Society
said at the time that "incense
use is associated with a
significantly increased risk
of upper-respiratory tract
cancer" although there was no
overall effect on lung cancer.
"It also considerably
increased the risk in `never'
smokers, which points to an
independent effect of incense
smoke."
The Taiwanese researchers also
cited a 1996 report in the
journal Cancer that showed a
high incidence of
nasopharyngeal carcinoma in
male Hong Kong patients who
burn incense, compared with
other malignant cases.
They found that 74.5 per cent
of the nasopharyngeal cancer
cases studied and 52 per cent
of all other malignant cases
were exposed to incense smoke,
and concluded that incense
smoke could be a factor.
Ko King-tim, an engineering
professor at City University
now in remission from the
cancer, says the public must
be aware of such risks
although he doesn't link his
disease with incense-burning.
"Most people are not aware of
the causes of various cancers.
Some are genetic, some are
[linked to] substances or
stress-induced," says Ko, who
created a website for people
with nasopharyngeal cancer.
"Most people in Hong Kong are
unaware of the early symptoms
of different cancers.
Awareness of these early
symptoms could save a lot of
lives," he says.
"Air pollutants such as
incense smoke or car exhaust
fumes are hazardous to health,
whether [they cause] cancers
or other illnesses."
Although various "herbal" and
"natural" incense options are
also sold on the internet, the
Taiwanese researchers stopped
short of calling for an end to
the deeply rooted tradition of
burning incense, with Lin
recommending devotees "keep
the room well-ventilated"
while they burn it.
"It will effectively dilute
indoor air pollutants and
hence reduce the risk of
exposure."
Incense sticks have a slender
bamboo stick onto which the
mixture of ingredients is
attached, while joss sticks
come without the stick. Stick
incense is the most popular in
temples in Asia.
While the exact content of
incense sticks is a commercial
secret, most are made from a
combination of fragrant gums,
resins, wood powders, herbs
and spices, the report says.
A typical stick of incense
comprises, by weight, 21 per
cent herb and wood powder, 35
per cent fragrance material,
11 per cent adhesive powder
and 33 per cent bamboo stick.
Source: www.scmp.com

 

altar_in_a_sample_landed_property.png


Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

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Isn't burning joss incense a form of air-pollution?

Once upon a time, many of us were concerned with secondary smoke aka air-pollution causing lung cancer.

Today, this report even have an added "nuisance" that it may also reduces intelligence....

467B54EF-33F2-4AFB-A65B-8C9CE14D891D.png


Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

Master Cecil Lee, Geomancy.Net

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